The Maternal Is Political: Women Writers at the Intersection of Motherhood and Social Change by Shari MacDonald Strong Kristin Rowe-Finkbeiner Judith Stadtman Tucker Sarah Masterson Marrit Ingman Stephanie Wilkinson Sarah Werthan Buttenwieser Karen Maezen Miller Online

The Maternal Is Political: Women Writers at the Intersection of Motherhood and Social Change
Title : The Maternal Is Political: Women Writers at the Intersection of Motherhood and Social Change
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9781580052436
Language : English
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 280

Exploring the vital connection between motherhood and social change, The Maternal Is Political features more than 40 powerful, hard-hitting literary essays by women who are striving to make the world a better place for children and families both their own and other women s in this country and globally. From the mom deconstructing playground "power games" with her first-graExploring the vital connection between motherhood and social change, The Maternal Is Political features more than 40 powerful, hard-hitting literary essays by women who are striving to make the world a better place for children and families both their own and other women s in this country and globally. From the mom deconstructing playground "power games" with her first-grade child, to the mother who speaks out against misogyny during an awkward road trip with her college-age daughter and friends, to the mother of sons worrying about the threat of a future military draft, The Maternal Is Political brings together the voices of women who are transforming the political and social: one child, one babysitter, one peace march at a time."


The Maternal Is Political: Women Writers at the Intersection of Motherhood and Social Change Reviews

  • Allison

    I was interested but somewhat skeptical when I decided to read this -- skeptical about any of it applying to me, anyway. I couldn't think of anything indicating that motherhood had turned me into anything much different from the same timid, wishy-washy, non-confrontational person I was before I gave birth. The book is quite interesting. As is often the case with this sort of project, most, if not all, of the contributors are quite highly educated, politically aware and articulate, so the reader [...]

  • Karen

    Guess why I'm reading this. There is one piece that is particularly close to my heart, hand and kin.

  • Beth Cato

    I won this signed anthology in a blog giveaway over two years ago. It has just been sitting on my shelf, passed over time and again. I couldn't help but think political equaled boring. However, all the recent political stupidity regarding women's bodies has had me rather pissed off, so I decided to give the book a try. If it turned out boring, I'd just stop reading.I didn't stop reading until the very last page.I was pleasantly surprised at how engaging the anthology turned out to be. The voices [...]

  • Kris Underwood

    Something definitely changes when you become MOTHER. Besides all the physical,emotional and mental aspects; the sleepless nights, cranky babies, the thought of being able to fit into your pre-baby jeans. You become more aware of the world and your place in it, of what is happening around you. You see things with a mother's eye. One of the essays, In Albania, by Mona Gable, captures this new view absolutely. Here she recounts her time in Albania as a reporter during the Kosovo conflict-Balkan war [...]

  • Brandy

    Fanfreakintastic. I received this book as a gift from a friend (thanks Bridge!) and started reading it during nursing sessions. BTW, other new moms, it's perfect for that because it's made up of short stories, each 3-10 pages, so easy to finish one and put down without stopping in the middle of something big. It's inspiring and moving and makes you feel fired up to do something with all your caring. Incidentally, the most moving passages for me were not those written by the big names listed on t [...]

  • Sarah

    This book was ok. I think that it might have been more powerful if you have no experience with organized feminist political action, if the idea of motherhood being political was a revelation, or if you have never thought much about the oppressive social expectations that motherhood brings. But since that is old hat to me, I found that this book didn't tread much new ground. As a feminist anthology, it is only so-so.

  • Heidi

    Wonderful collection of short essays that really tugged at something I've become very passionate about in the past three or so years. The ones highlighting the process from becoming interested to actively campaigning were especially meaningful to me. And, of course, Barbara Kingsolver's essay - always a treat to read her.

  • Johanna

    Would have loved to have this book when I was writing my thesis! Some very good essays (looooved Susie Bright's), some pretty predictable and maudlin. At times it was a bit clunky and scattered, and there were a few essays that I think were thrown in purely for star power - Benazir Bhutto and Nancy Pelosi come to mind. But overall, and enjoyable read.

  • MM

    hmmm, for me this was a snooze. I couldn't get through all the essays, skimming most. I really wanted to like this and find something insightful -- just didn't, really. But you know what, I'm giving it 3-stars because I did like some parts of some of the essays and plus I think it's good to articulate those concepts: maternal/political. Yeah.

  • LaLa

    Don't get me wrong, not alllll the essays were perfect. That would be impossible in a collection this varied and huge. BUT a lot of the essays were luminous, funny, brave, insightful and true. And as a girl who is scared to have babies, this was a great book for me.

  • missy jean

    It's always hard to rate anthologies. In this one, there were a handful of unflinching 5-star essays. But half of the essays felt like an echo chamber of unexamined assumptions, so I can't rate the book as a whole very high.

  • Maggie

    I quite liked this - it made me feel better about being a crank trying to make the world a slightly better place. Inspiring.

  • Diana

    So far so good. A collection of essays that are quick to read (which really works right now) and make you think.

  • Erika

    LOVE the short essays. True to life stories with loads of character threaded into commentary on ethical and political beliefs inregards to motherhood.

  • Samantha

    i have already re-read it several times. only a few snoozers in the bunch, the rest thought provoking, engaging, and delightful.

  • Kay Kay

    I did not agree with most of this book. I thought it was very one sided and depressing. I don't think most mothers would agree with this one.

  • Aubrey

    This book was amazing. I found myself trying to figure out how to become more active, and bring my son with me. I want him to believe that he can change the world for the better.

  • Kate

    Great concept - there's 3 or 4 real standouts, but the organic / "gender positive!" mamas are tedious.

  • Activistas

    Local Portland mama is the editor of this great collection of thought-provoking essays. Perfect for the busy parent who can only read essays, not full books!

  • Allegra S

    Oh gosh I'm so embarrassed. I got this because I thought it was curated by Nina Gaby and I loved her collection in Dumped and thought she chose excellent stories to include there. However, Nina Gaby was a contributor here, not an editor.Well, I have to say, I mostly didn't like it. It seemed as though these ladies were asked to write about the intersection of parenting and politics and their minds automatically went politics = Democrat/Republican, I have to write about how we are a good Democrat [...]

  • Caroline

    This is a terrific collection; varied voices, beautiful writing. Read my full review here:foodthought/2008/06/mother

  • Jennifer